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A TICKING HITS LIST
Surely you have the time to take a look. (8/7a)
THE GREAT CATALOG GOLD RUSH
Is mining the past the future? (8/10a)
TIKTOK RESPONDS TO TRUMP'S BAN
The kids are not alright with Trump. (8/7a)
POP SMOKE GAINS, DABABY LEADS OUR SONG CHART
And the streams just keep on coming. (8/7a)
THE BABE & THE MULE
Interscope's co-MVPs (8/7a)
BTS BRINGS IT
They're so dreamy.
VOTE BY MAIL
It's a conspiracy, because everyone does it.
IS IT CHRISTMAS?
No, but we're thinking about cookies.
WOKE MUSIC
Protest songs that sound like now.
Critics' Choice
NIGHTCLUBBING 'S PIONEERING SPIRIT
1/7/16

As EDM continues to be a force in contemporary culture, many young DJs are starting to look back for a cutting edge in the booth, by digging in the crates to find rare club classics from the 80's and 90's—widely known to be a vibrant renaissance period for club/dance music. 

To meet the new demand with as much flavor as possible, Universal Music UK’s Catalogue team has spent over a year and a half going back through the vaults of groundbreaking dance music labels like as AM:PM, 4th & Broadway, and Ten Records to find some truly special house music classics and digitizing them for a new generation. 

The result of their efforts is Nightclubbing, a project that has been a labor of love for all involved. 

Some of the insanely rare cuts that have been unearthed include were two remixes by MK, of Nightcrawlers’ club classic "Push the Feeling On," Todd Terry mixes of Soul II Soul's "Love Enuff," Masters At Work remixes of Bizarre Inc’s "Keep The Music Strong" and the iconic versions of Crystal Waters' "Makin Happy" from Chicago legend Steve 'Silk' Hurley. It's a treasure trove, people. 

Led by UMC A&R manager Robin Jenkins, along with AFEM (the Association For Electronic Music), the Nightclubbing team have unearthed over 250 tracks. Many of these cuts were only released as limited editions on vinyl and have been missing from the world for two decades. 

Jenkins says, “We're uncovering remixes from the original godfathers of the dancefloor, which sound just as fresh now as when they were originally played more than 20 years ago. Key areas of our catalogue were unavailable to a modern audience, so there were lots of missing reference points to the younger fan on why electronic music sounds the way it does today. It’s great that we can offer these to the next generations of DJs and clubbers.”